Malaria Prevention Tips

by Dave on February 8, 2012 · 4 comments

Mosquito netting on Koh Phi Phi (Thailand)

Mosquito netting on Koh Phi Phi (Thailand)

This post was written by me in partnership with Lloyds Pharmacy.

Contracting malaria remains one of the biggest travel fears of globetrotting backpackers.

A little over 4 years ago, before leaving on my trip around the world, I researched malaria prevention tips in an effort to further educate myself.

I’d taken a few different anti malaria tablets on short, 2-week vacations to Costa Rica and Belize/Guatemala, however I was preparing to embark on a 12+ month journey across multiple continents, including Africa.

Malaria prevention is a multi-step process.

Education

Before visiting any new country, do some quick online queries to determine the risk for malaria.

The United States’ Center for Disease Control (CDC) website are an excellent resource, and offer detailed information for every country, organized nicely in the form of charts and maps.

Additionally, as I did, you can make an appointment with your local travel clinic (or family doctor).

Remember, just because a country is known to have malaria doesn’t mean every region of that country has it too.

Often, malaria doesn’t exist in large urban areas, such as capital cities, or at higher altitudes.

The degree of risk can also vary greatly by season. Mosquitoes are more prevalent in the wet seasons, thus your risk of getting bitten will be higher at those times.

Preventing Mosquito Bites

Once you’ve arrived in an area known to have malaria, these are the common steps you can take to minimize your risk of being bitten:

  • Stay inside at night, when the mosquitoes are most active. If you don’t have windows, make sure you’ve got screens. If you have neither, make sure you’re using a mosquito net over your bed or hammock.
  • Wear protective clothing, such as long sleeve shirts, pants, socks and shoes.  Some brands of travel clothing are pre-treated with Permethrin, a chemical insect repellent.  Alternatively, you can also buy the chemical and treat clothes yourself.
  • Use insect repellent, preferably containing DEET, on your exposed skin. Repellent is available in strengths as high as 100% DEET, however I personally feel more comfortable with lower concentrations (around 30%).

Anecdotally, it always seems as though one person amongst a group will get bitten more than the rest.

If you’re known to attract mosquitoes more than your friends, it’s even more important that you take protective measures seriously.

Medications to Prevent Malaria

[Disclaimer: I'm a backpacker, not a pharmacist. Consult a medical professional for assistance in deciding which medication is right for you.]

The third and final step to preventing malaria is to take a prophylaxis.  While there’s still no vaccine for malaria, there are several preventive options available that can reduce your risk of contracting the disease.

The medication you choose will depend on a variety of factors, including region you’re visiting, pre-existing conditions and/or other medications being taken, potential side effects, cost, and likelihood that you’ll comply with instructions for taking the medication.

Some medications need to be taken daily, while others are weekly.

  • Chloroquine - taken weekly. Starts 1-2 weeks before travel, and continues for 4 weeks after you’ve left the risk area.
  • Doxycycline – taken daily. Starts 2 days before entry into the affected region and continues for 30 days after you’ve left. This is the cheapest and most widely available option. It also has amongst the most benign side effects, including digestive problems and increased risk for sunburn.
  • Malarone – taken daily. Starts 1-2 days before travel, and continues for 7 days after you’ve left the risk area. This is a more expensive drug than Doxycycline, and therefore better for shorter trips.
  • Lariam – taken weekly. Potential side effects involve the nervous system, and include reports of extremely vivid (bad) dreams, and psychosis.

Once I hit the road, I found that many of my fears about malaria fell by the wayside.

There’s a worldwide effort to eradicate malaria, and large swaths of many countries have freed themselves of the disease.

Even traveling within those countries still at risk, many of the most popular tourist areas are now safe.

As long as you educate yourself, and take the necessary steps to protect yourself, fear of malaria should not be a reason in and of itself to keep you from exploring new destinations.

About the Author:

is the author of 1728 posts on Go Backpacking.

Dave is Editor and Founder of Go Backpacking and Medellin Living, and the Co-founder of Travel Blog Success. Follow him on Twitter @rtwdave or Google+

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4 Comments

mary February 8, 2012 at 3:26 pm

Thanks.

Reply

adventureswithben February 8, 2012 at 9:18 pm

The first time I bought Malarone for a 6-week business trip to Africa, I paid $350. Fortunately, it was paid for on the corporate card.

Reply

Dave February 9, 2012 at 9:25 am

By comparison, I think Doxycycline is around a $1 per pill/day, so the equivalent would’ve been $180 for the trip + $30 for the month afterwards ($210) total. It might actually be cheaper. Been awhile since I bought it in the US.

Reply

Elizabeth | Cheap accommodation February 12, 2012 at 10:33 pm

Adventures with Ben- the cost may have been expensive but I bet it was cheaper than malaria.

Reply

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