The Salvador Dalí Museum in Figueres

by Dave on October 26, 2012 · 0 comments

The Salvador Dalí Museum in Figueres

Exterior view of the The Salvador Dalí Museum in Figueres. Large, white eggs line the roof, while golden pieces of bread are represented across the red walls.

Located in his home town of Figueres, the Salvador Dalí Museum hosts an immense collection of the artist’s paintings, sculptures, and jewels.

Everything from the building facade, to the layout of the interior courtyard, reflects the Spanish artist’s perspective on the world.

The day before the TBEX conference kicked off, I had the chance to visit along with a group of fellow bloggers.

While our guided tour of the museum showcased the highlights, it deserves a good 3-4 hours if you want to take it all in.

I’d recommend a guided tour for the information, plus additional time to wander and explore on your own.

Entrance to the Salvador Dalí Museum in Figueres

The entrance to the Teatro Museo Dalí features dead people, and knight’s armor balancing bread on their heads. Golden, Oscar-like statues appear with their arms held high along the roof.

Picasso by Salvador Dalí

Picasso by Salvador Dalí

The open-air inner courtyard features a suspended sailboat

The open-air inner courtyard features a suspended sailboat

Down below, a Cadillac draws visitor's attention in the inner courtyard

Down below, a Cadillac draws visitor’s attention in the inner courtyard

Two images are present in this painting. From a distance, one sees a portrait of Abraham Lincoln, while standing closer reveals a nude image of Dalí's wife, Gala Dalí.

Two images are present in this painting. From a distance, one sees a portrait of Abraham Lincoln, while standing closer reveals a nude image of Dalí’s wife, Gala Dalí.

A massive ceiling fresco depicts Salvador Dalí (blue) and his wife, Gala Dalí, ascending toward heaven.

A massive ceiling fresco depicts Salvador Dalí (blue) and his wife, Gala Dalí, ascending toward heaven.

Salvador Dalí's tomb

The final resting place of Salvador Dalí, who preferred to be buried alongside his wife, but for political reasons (money, perhaps?), ended up at his museum in Figueres.

A gold ring in the shape of a corset, designed by Dalí

A gold ring in the shape of a corset, designed by Dalí

The Royal Heart

The Royal Heart is mechanically designed to pulse, in imitation of a real heartbeat. Far and away, this is my favorite piece of artwork by Salvador Dalí.



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What You Need to Know

How Much: $15.50 (includes entrance to the jewel exhibition)

Address: Gala-Salvador Dalí Square, 5, E-17600 Figueres, Spain

How to Get There: Figueres can be reached by bus or train, most easily as a day trip from Girona. For serious fans, it’s also possible to do it as a long day trip from Barcelona.

Time Required: 3-4 hours

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My visit to the Salvador Dalí Museum was as a guest of the Costa Brava Tourism Board.

About the Author:

is the author of 1703 posts on Go Backpacking.

Dave is Editor and Founder of Go Backpacking and Medellin Living, and the Co-founder of Travel Blog Success. Follow him on Twitter @rtwdave or Google+

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Categories: Features, Spain
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